When To Look For A New Job

Performance dip

A dip in your performance levels can be a sign to move on. Everybody has bad days, even weeks, but if you notice your performance has dropped over a sustained period it is probably time to move on. This is usually nothing to do with your ability but a sign that you are bored and need a new job challenge.

Joining the disgruntled

At every company there are those who moan about their job without ever doing anything about it. This sort of negative attitude is infectious and, if you find yourself socialising with these people, it is very easy to get sucked into their way of thinking. If this happens, you need to take a step back and decide whether a new job might improve your mindset.

Stuck in a rut

If you see yourself retiring in the job you are currently doing that could be for one of two reasons: either you’ve found the job of your dreams (unlikely) or you are too settled to move (more likely). If it is the latter, then it takes a lot of courage to exit your comfort zone and start looking at what jobs are on the market.

Cons outweigh the pros

Whether you’re happy in your job or not, weighing up the pros and cons of your current employment is a good way to gauge your job satisfaction. Sometimes it is easy to focus on the bad, other times it is easy to ignore those same issues. Writing a clear pros and cons list and totting up which side comes out on top is a good exercise to perform on a six-monthly basis to ensure you don’t end up coasting along in a job and regretting it in later life.

Know what you want

Following on from your pros and cons list, another good exercise is to write a list of job desires; be it employee benefits, extra money or different working hours. Use this list as the basis for a conversation with your employer and see if they are willing to accommodate any of them. If they are not, then it is probably time to contact a recruiter who can help find you exactly what you are looking for.

No development

In any job it is important to develop your professional skills, and this is no different within the Quality and pharmaceutical sectors. It is important to take stock of your own development via a yearly review. Write down what you have learnt over the last year, what skills you have harnessed, and what training you have been given by your employer. If there is an area you want to develop, but are unable to in your current role, it is probably time to look for a new job that will challenge you and allow you to grow.

Feeling invisible

Being made to feel valued in your job is a crucial factor when it comes to job satisfaction. This can come directly from your line manager, upper management or a team of people you manage. It is good to have regular, open conversations with your boss to discuss both what you need to improve on and what you are doing well. If you still are feeling overlooked despite your best efforts, then it may be time to look for an employer who would value your skill set.

Pay problems

Excluding the super-rich, most of us work to pay the bills. Finding a job that you enjoy is important, but if it doesn’t pay enough then it’s time to look for a job that you both enjoy and that pays you a satisfactory wage. If you believe that you are underpaid in your current job, it is a good idea to research the going-rate is your role. With this information at your disposal you can ask your employer to increase your wage to what you believe you are worth. If your employer is not willing to match your wage expectations, then it is time to look for a new job. There are always employers out there who are looking to pay a fair wage and being paid what you are worth can only improve your job satisfaction and general wellbeing.

Making a move

Even if you have your dream job and are paid well, if you hate the location where you work, it may be time to move on. GxPeople is a global recruitment agency with Quality recruiters positioned around the world. If you are looking to move then GxPeople can help you find the right job for you in a new location.

Quality is not an act. It is a habit
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